Tyla, New Zealander, Marine science major at Auckland University with a love for all things science.
Reblogged from subatomiccc  2,604 notes

zerostatereflex:

Man Creates The First Ever Leaf That Turns Light and Water Into Oxygen

"If humanity hopes to realize its dreams of exploring the stars, we’re going to need to find ways to recreate life on Earth aboard a spaceship. Simply stockpiling enough vital supplies isn’t going to cut it, which is what led Julian Melchiorri, a student at the Royal College of Art, to create an artificial biological leaf that produces oxygen just like the ones on our home planet do."

YES. Let’s get off this planet, shall we? 

Reblogged from apathyrocks  123,851 notes

sixpenceee:

Another way to present the 9 types of intelligence as exemplified by my How Do We Measure Intelligence post.

The basic idea is that different people are good at different things. These 9 probably don’t cover the wide range of smarts we all possess, but it’s a start.

As Albert Einstein said, ”Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”

Reblogged from for-science-sake  142 notes

for-science-sake:

Vanadium is a soft metal that is used to make tough alloys with steel. Vanadium is produced by the reduction of Vandium Oxide and Vanadium Pentaoxide by Calcium or the electrolysis of molten Vandium Chloride. It has a number of oxidation states. 

Vanadium Oxide is amphoteric meaning it can react with acids and bases. Bases produce the colourless ion where as acids produce the yellow Dioxovanadium ion above. The blue vanadium ion is produced by the reduction of the product of the yellow ion and with further reducing you reach the green oxidation state and lastly the violet oxidation state. 

Reblogged from for-science-sake  70 notes

for-science-sake:

Fluorapatite is a mineralwith the formula Ca5(PO4)3F (calcium fluorophosphate). Fluorapatite is a hard crystalline solid. It can exists in a variety of colors: Green, violet, purple, blue, pink, yellow, brown, white, colorless or multi-coloured. 

The colorless, pure form of this mineral is an important constituent of tooth enamel.

This is related to fluoride in tooth paste. Minerals get lost from the teeth and form cavities which get filled with bacteria which causes tooth decay. Fluoride reacts with the teeth and remineralizes the damaged enamel- however it cannot fix a cavity once its been created. The fluoride-teeth compound makes teeth less susceptible to acid-attack and there is evidence that it can also inhibit the growth of bacteria and limit their capacity for corroding teeth. 

Reblogged from amnhnyc  298 notes
amnhnyc:

Happy #NationalFossilDay! Can you tell which of the above are dinosaur teeth? Below are the answers.
Clockwise from top:
Tyrannosaurus rex tooth (Late Cretaceous, western US) 
Tyrannosaur tooth (Late Cretaceous, Judith River, MT) 
Rugose coral (Middle Devonian, Falls of the Ohio, Clarksville, Indiana) 
Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown) 
Ornithomimid toe claw (Late Cretaceous, western US)
Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown)
Tyrannosaur tooth (Late Cretaceous, Judith River, MT) 
Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown)
Theropod tooth (Late Cretaceous, Ojo Alamo, NM) 
Tyrannosaur toe claw (Late Cretaceous, western US). 
All are fossils except, technically, the T. rex tooth at the top, which is actually a cast of a real tooth. The rugose corals (also known as solitary or horn corals) are very often mistaken for dinosaur teeth but are older than the oldest dinosaurs, having gone extinct around 250 million years ago (the oldest known dinosaurs are around 230 million years old).
Learn more on the Museum’s Division of Paleontology website. 

amnhnyc:

Happy #NationalFossilDay! Can you tell which of the above are dinosaur teeth? Below are the answers.

Clockwise from top:

  • Tyrannosaurus rex tooth (Late Cretaceous, western US)
  • Tyrannosaur tooth (Late Cretaceous, Judith River, MT)
  • Rugose coral (Middle Devonian, Falls of the Ohio, Clarksville, Indiana)
  • Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown)
  • Ornithomimid toe claw (Late Cretaceous, western US)
  • Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown)
  • Tyrannosaur tooth (Late Cretaceous, Judith River, MT)
  • Rugose coral (Paleozoic, locality unknown)
  • Theropod tooth (Late Cretaceous, Ojo Alamo, NM)
  • Tyrannosaur toe claw (Late Cretaceous, western US). 

All are fossils except, technically, the T. rex tooth at the top, which is actually a cast of a real tooth. The rugose corals (also known as solitary or horn corals) are very often mistaken for dinosaur teeth but are older than the oldest dinosaurs, having gone extinct around 250 million years ago (the oldest known dinosaurs are around 230 million years old).

Learn more on the Museum’s Division of Paleontology website

Starfish are pretty amazing.

A friend of mine keeps them, 2 months ago he had an 11 armed starfish and recently it split into two, one with 6 arms and another with 5. They are now two completely different, fully functioning starfish! Both super active and eating well.

Another one of his star fish once got caught in the filter and dropped all its legs to escape and he ended up with multiple starfish! Isn’t nature fascinating? 

Reblogged from that-science-bitch  649 notes

cool-critters:

Temminck´s tragopan (Tragopan temminckii)

The Temminck’s tragopan is a medium-sized, approximately 64 cm long, pheasant in the genus Tragopan.

The male is a stocky red-and-orange bird with white-spotted plumage, black bill and pink legs. It has a bare blue facial skin, inflatable dark-blue lappet and horns.

The female is a white-spotted brown bird with blue circular eye skin. The diet consists mainly of berries, grass and plants.

The Temminck’s tragopan is distributed in forests of northern South Asia, from northeast India, northwest Vietnam, Tibet and northern provinces of China.

photo credits: allandoopheasantry, zetaboards, Peter Stubbs

Reblogged from mindblowingscience  344 notes
libutron:

Coccolithophores
Tiny coccolithophores have had a big impact on the planet over time. Though they are single-celled, these photosynthesizing organisms are enclosed in a mosaic, or cage, of microscopic plates that make many very beautiful to look at. The plates are made of calcium carbonate, which the coccoliths pull from the surrounding water. As these small organisms live and die in their trillions, they bequeath their tiny plates to the ocean floor where they form rocks such as chalk. Over geological time, coccoliths have removed significant amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, helping to keep Earth cool as the sun grew hotter.
Photo and text source: ©BBC Nature

libutron:

Coccolithophores

Tiny coccolithophores have had a big impact on the planet over time. Though they are single-celled, these photosynthesizing organisms are enclosed in a mosaic, or cage, of microscopic plates that make many very beautiful to look at. The plates are made of calcium carbonate, which the coccoliths pull from the surrounding water. As these small organisms live and die in their trillions, they bequeath their tiny plates to the ocean floor where they form rocks such as chalk. Over geological time, coccoliths have removed significant amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, helping to keep Earth cool as the sun grew hotter.

Photo and text source: ©BBC Nature