Tyla, New Zealander, Marine science major at Auckland University with a love for all things science.
Reblogged from kai-ni  118 notes
Could you maybe talk about axolotl morphs for a bit? (: I'm very curious about the variations.
Anonymous

kai-ni:

Sure! Axolotls are super cool :D

First of all, you should know the morphs we have bred in captivity are not comparable to the wild Axolotls - they were crossbred with tiger salamanders to introduce the albino gene.

So with that in mind, first we have the wild-type! (not to be confused with an actual wild Axolotl! These are still captive-bred, they just LOOK like how the wilds look).

image

Wildtypes are olive colored and spotty, and can have shiny pigments (iridiophores).

Then we have Melanoid Axoltols!  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melanism

image

Melanoids are darker, and you can tell them from wildtypes by the fact that wildtypes have that shiny ring in their eye, and melanoids don’t. They also lack iridiophores.

Then we move on to the popular pink Leucistic. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leucism

image

They are pink with black eyes!

Not to be confused with the Albino Axolotl!

image

They have those pink/red albino eyes! (Every time I search ‘Albino axolotl’ a bunch of leucistic ones come up - nope! incorrect!)

We also have Golden Albino Axolotls, which my Zion here demonstrates

image

He has the albino eyes, he’s just very gold! It should be noted most golds are darker than zion is - he’s a pretty pastel boy. They can get pretty dark orange looking.

image

There are a few other rare mixes of these - such as piebald or melanoid albino (You would think that wouldn’t be possible) but they’re hardly worth mentioning as they’re so rare.

The other thing is chimerism happens sometimes!

image

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chimera_%28genetics%29

(and holy butts let me tell you how much I WANT A CHIMERIC AXOLOTL. Chimerism deeply fascinates me and it is my dream to have a chimeric lotl. so PS any lotl breeders out there if you happen to get a chimeric, I will pay top dollar just throwing that out there)

Another thing to note is GFP Axolotls - Glowing fluorescent protein. Basically these are Axolotls (of any color morph) that are bred/genetically modified to have certain jellyfish proteins in them that glow under a blacklight. this was done so SCIENTISTS could view tissue regeneration under blacklight.

Glowing:

image

When not under blacklight, the protein gives them a weird greenish hue.

image

in my opinion, these have no place in the pet trade. They were originally created for scientific purposes, and putting the animal under a blacklight is cruel to them; it has been documented that they see the UV spectrum and the light distresses them. Plus it makes their eyes themselves glow. So again, no place in the pet trade for people who just want them because ‘lol my pet glOWS in the DARK’ which isn’t even accurate.

So there’s my rant on Axolotl morphs, anon!

Reblogged from fishyjoead  8,857 notes
moreanimalia:

aquasplendens:

realitymonster:

hypeangel:

Pew!

wat

I SAW THIS THE OTHER NIGHT ON TV! So the little thing he’s spitting out is a type of plankton that emits a light when it’s threatened by predators. So, the tetra ate it, and it felt threatened, so it emitted this light which the tetra didn’t like (aka didn’t want to be spotted by other predators at night) so it spat it out!

This was on the show Super Senses, which I talked about the other day because it is an excellent nature show!

moreanimalia:

aquasplendens:

realitymonster:

hypeangel:

Pew!

wat

I SAW THIS THE OTHER NIGHT ON TV!
So the little thing he’s spitting out is a type of plankton that emits a light when it’s threatened by predators. So, the tetra ate it, and it felt threatened, so it emitted this light which the tetra didn’t like (aka didn’t want to be spotted by other predators at night) so it spat it out!

This was on the show Super Senses, which I talked about the other day because it is an excellent nature show!

Reblogged from thatscienceguy  1,630 notes

thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE

Reblogged from anoceanofmystery  674 notes

popsealife:

3D Camo

Those things growing out of this giant Australian cuttlefish (Sepia apama) are its skin papillae. It can extend and retract its papillae at will, helping it alter its texture to better blend in with its surroundings.

Both papillae expression and color change are controlled by visual, not tactile, cues. This means that these guys don’t need to actually touch anything to decide on their camouflage strategy.

Just by looking, they are clever enough to decide what sort of color, pattern, and texture is needed to virtually disappear. 

video source: Roger Hanlon on Youtube

reference: Allen et al. 2009.

                 Hanlon. 2007.

Reblogged from mindblowingscience  846 notes
libutron:

Poison Dart Frogs | ©John Meszaros
Poison dart frog Taxonomy is constantly changing as herpetologists reclassify species. For this piece, artist (John Meszaros) tried to use the most up-to-date scientific names from [1] and [2].
Clockwise from top: (1) Ameerega silverstonei; (2) Excidobates mysteriousus; (3) Phyllobates bicolor, (4) Phyllobates terribilis; (5) Dendrobates leucomelas; (6) Dendrobates tinctorius; (7) Dendrobates azureus; (8) Dendrobates auratus; (9) Phyllobates vittatus; (10) Ameerega cainarachi; (11) Ranitomeya imitator; (12) Oophaga granulifera; (13) Dendrobates pumilio; and (14) Epipedobates anthonyi.

libutron:

Poison Dart Frogs | ©John Meszaros

Poison dart frog Taxonomy is constantly changing as herpetologists reclassify species. For this piece, artist (John Meszaros) tried to use the most up-to-date scientific names from [1] and [2].

Clockwise from top: (1) Ameerega silverstonei; (2) Excidobates mysteriousus; (3) Phyllobates bicolor, (4) Phyllobates terribilis; (5) Dendrobates leucomelas; (6) Dendrobates tinctorius; (7) Dendrobates azureus; (8) Dendrobates auratus; (9) Phyllobates vittatus; (10) Ameerega cainarachi; (11) Ranitomeya imitator; (12) Oophaga granulifera; (13) Dendrobates pumilio; and (14) Epipedobates anthonyi.

Reblogged from goteamscience  376 notes
astrodidact:

When lizards are caught by predators, they can drop their tails to escape and then grow the appendage back. Scientists have studied this regeneration process for decades, in the hopes of understanding how to regenerate human tissues, such as damaged spinal chords and even lost limbs.
Now a team of scientists from Arizona State University in the US has performed the first analysis of all RNA molecules, which translate genes into proteins, during the tail regeneration of a green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis), and worked out the genetic “recipe” that controls the regrowth process. Their results have been published in PLOS ONE.
http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20142308-26062.html

astrodidact:

When lizards are caught by predators, they can drop their tails to escape and then grow the appendage back. Scientists have studied this regeneration process for decades, in the hopes of understanding how to regenerate human tissues, such as damaged spinal chords and even lost limbs.

Now a team of scientists from Arizona State University in the US has performed the first analysis of all RNA molecules, which translate genes into proteins, during the tail regeneration of a green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis), and worked out the genetic “recipe” that controls the regrowth process. Their results have been published in PLOS ONE.

http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20142308-26062.html
Reblogged from rhamphotheca  615 notes

cool-critters:

Olm (Proteus anguinus)

The olm, or proteus, is the only cave-dwelling chordate species found in Europe. In contrast to many amphibians, it is entirely aquatic, and it eats, sleeps, and breeds underwater.

Living in caves found in Dinaric Alps, it is endemic to the waters that flow underground through extensive limestone of karst of Central and Southeastern Europe, specifically the southern Slovenia, the Soča river basin near Trieste, Italy, southwestern Croatia, and Herzegovina.

This animal is most notable for its adaptations to a life of complete darkness in its underground habitat. The olm’s eyes are undeveloped, leaving it blind, while its other senses, particularly those of smell and hearing, are acutely developed. It also lacks any pigmentation in its skin. It has three toes on its forelimbs, but two toes on its hind feet. It also exhibits neoteny, retaining larval characteristics like external gills into adulthood.

The olm’s body is snakelike, 20–30 cm (8–12 in) long, with some specimens reaching up to 40 centimetres (16 in). The olm is extremely vulnerable to changes in its environment due to its adaptation to the specific conditions in caves.

On the IUCN Red List, the olm is listed as vulnerable because of its fragmented and limited distribution and ever-decreasing population.

photo credits: Boštjan Burger, mesozoico, slovenia, animalworld

Reblogged from mechanicanimal  10,139 notes

spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com