Tyla, New Zealander, Marine science major at Auckland University with a love for all things science.
You can do better. Your bf seems like a creep
Anonymous

This boyfriend of mine has helped me through the hardest year of my life if it weren’t for this brilliant man I can say with confidence that I wouldn’t be here.

I can’t and have no desire to do better because he is absolutely perfect for me, i love him and he has done so much to make my life as good as it now is. He is also very far from a creep you ignorant, anonymous asshole. 

Reblogged from mindblowingscience  330 notes
libutron:

Coccolithophores
Tiny coccolithophores have had a big impact on the planet over time. Though they are single-celled, these photosynthesizing organisms are enclosed in a mosaic, or cage, of microscopic plates that make many very beautiful to look at. The plates are made of calcium carbonate, which the coccoliths pull from the surrounding water. As these small organisms live and die in their trillions, they bequeath their tiny plates to the ocean floor where they form rocks such as chalk. Over geological time, coccoliths have removed significant amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, helping to keep Earth cool as the sun grew hotter.
Photo and text source: ©BBC Nature

libutron:

Coccolithophores

Tiny coccolithophores have had a big impact on the planet over time. Though they are single-celled, these photosynthesizing organisms are enclosed in a mosaic, or cage, of microscopic plates that make many very beautiful to look at. The plates are made of calcium carbonate, which the coccoliths pull from the surrounding water. As these small organisms live and die in their trillions, they bequeath their tiny plates to the ocean floor where they form rocks such as chalk. Over geological time, coccoliths have removed significant amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, helping to keep Earth cool as the sun grew hotter.

Photo and text source: ©BBC Nature

Reblogged from dragonfxcker  121 notes


bettablogging
:

I thought I would at least use my personal misery to give you guys an education about betta breeding. B. mahachai and B. splendens breed very similarly! There are some key differences, however.

Click on the pictures to read the captions of what is happening and hit the “read more” for a detailed explanation of everything that is going on.

Reblogged from science-junkie  1,101 notes

bbsrc:

The secrets of cell development

Amazingly, all the cells in our body have exactly the same DNA and yet still manage to be completely different and carry out different jobs, from pumping our hearts to fighting off infections!

We have epigenetic marks to thank for this. Epigenetic marks (special molecules that attach at certain areas of the DNA) control how a DNA sequence is read and provide a mechanism for cell memory, without affecting the DNA sequence itself. These marks allow cells to interpret the uniform genetic information in different ways, by switching different genes on or off. The marks also help cells to remember which genes should be on and off and they can also pass this information onto other cells during cell division.

Without these epigenetic mechanisms cells would lose their identity, and to some extent that is what happens in diseases like cancer.

BBSRC-funded Professor Wolf Reik and Dr Fatima Santos, from the University Of Cambridge and The Babraham Institute, are studying stem cells, like the cells above, to find out more about epigenetic information: research which is providing us with new approaches to improve the potential of stem cells for regenerative medicine.

Image credits: Dr Fatima Santos

Read more: http://www.epigenesys.eu/en/

Read more: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/people-skills-training/2014/140612-f-gb-bioscience-pioneers-wolf-reik.aspx

Reblogged from kai-ni  171 notes
Could you maybe talk about axolotl morphs for a bit? (: I'm very curious about the variations.
Anonymous

kai-ni:

Sure! Axolotls are super cool :D

First of all, you should know the morphs we have bred in captivity are not comparable to the wild Axolotls - they were crossbred with tiger salamanders to introduce the albino gene.

So with that in mind, first we have the wild-type! (not to be confused with an actual wild Axolotl! These are still captive-bred, they just LOOK like how the wilds look).

image

Wildtypes are olive colored and spotty, and can have shiny pigments (iridiophores).

Then we have Melanoid Axoltols!  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melanism

image

Melanoids are darker, and you can tell them from wildtypes by the fact that wildtypes have that shiny ring in their eye, and melanoids don’t. They also lack iridiophores.

Then we move on to the popular pink Leucistic. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leucism

image

They are pink with black eyes!

Not to be confused with the Albino Axolotl!

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They have those pink/red albino eyes! (Every time I search ‘Albino axolotl’ a bunch of leucistic ones come up - nope! incorrect!)

We also have Golden Albino Axolotls, which my Zion here demonstrates

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He has the albino eyes, he’s just very gold! It should be noted most golds are darker than zion is - he’s a pretty pastel boy. They can get pretty dark orange looking.

image

There are a few other rare mixes of these - such as piebald or melanoid albino (You would think that wouldn’t be possible) but they’re hardly worth mentioning as they’re so rare.

The other thing is chimerism happens sometimes!

image

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chimera_%28genetics%29

(and holy butts let me tell you how much I WANT A CHIMERIC AXOLOTL. Chimerism deeply fascinates me and it is my dream to have a chimeric lotl. so PS any lotl breeders out there if you happen to get a chimeric, I will pay top dollar just throwing that out there)

Another thing to note is GFP Axolotls - Glowing fluorescent protein. Basically these are Axolotls (of any color morph) that are bred/genetically modified to have certain jellyfish proteins in them that glow under a blacklight. this was done so SCIENTISTS could view tissue regeneration under blacklight.

Glowing:

image

When not under blacklight, the protein gives them a weird greenish hue.

image

in my opinion, these have no place in the pet trade. They were originally created for scientific purposes, and putting the animal under a blacklight is cruel to them; it has been documented that they see the UV spectrum and the light distresses them. Plus it makes their eyes themselves glow. So again, no place in the pet trade for people who just want them because ‘lol my pet glOWS in the DARK’ which isn’t even accurate.

So there’s my rant on Axolotl morphs, anon!

Reblogged from fishyjoead  11,784 notes
moreanimalia:

aquasplendens:

realitymonster:

hypeangel:

Pew!

wat

I SAW THIS THE OTHER NIGHT ON TV! So the little thing he’s spitting out is a type of plankton that emits a light when it’s threatened by predators. So, the tetra ate it, and it felt threatened, so it emitted this light which the tetra didn’t like (aka didn’t want to be spotted by other predators at night) so it spat it out!

This was on the show Super Senses, which I talked about the other day because it is an excellent nature show!

moreanimalia:

aquasplendens:

realitymonster:

hypeangel:

Pew!

wat

I SAW THIS THE OTHER NIGHT ON TV!
So the little thing he’s spitting out is a type of plankton that emits a light when it’s threatened by predators. So, the tetra ate it, and it felt threatened, so it emitted this light which the tetra didn’t like (aka didn’t want to be spotted by other predators at night) so it spat it out!

This was on the show Super Senses, which I talked about the other day because it is an excellent nature show!

Reblogged from thatscienceguy  3,883 notes

thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE