Tyla, New Zealander, Marine science major at Auckland University with a love for all things science.
Reblogged from goteamscience  318 notes
astrodidact:

When lizards are caught by predators, they can drop their tails to escape and then grow the appendage back. Scientists have studied this regeneration process for decades, in the hopes of understanding how to regenerate human tissues, such as damaged spinal chords and even lost limbs.
Now a team of scientists from Arizona State University in the US has performed the first analysis of all RNA molecules, which translate genes into proteins, during the tail regeneration of a green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis), and worked out the genetic “recipe” that controls the regrowth process. Their results have been published in PLOS ONE.
http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20142308-26062.html

astrodidact:

When lizards are caught by predators, they can drop their tails to escape and then grow the appendage back. Scientists have studied this regeneration process for decades, in the hopes of understanding how to regenerate human tissues, such as damaged spinal chords and even lost limbs.

Now a team of scientists from Arizona State University in the US has performed the first analysis of all RNA molecules, which translate genes into proteins, during the tail regeneration of a green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis), and worked out the genetic “recipe” that controls the regrowth process. Their results have been published in PLOS ONE.

http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20142308-26062.html
Reblogged from rhamphotheca  580 notes

cool-critters:

Olm (Proteus anguinus)

The olm, or proteus, is the only cave-dwelling chordate species found in Europe. In contrast to many amphibians, it is entirely aquatic, and it eats, sleeps, and breeds underwater.

Living in caves found in Dinaric Alps, it is endemic to the waters that flow underground through extensive limestone of karst of Central and Southeastern Europe, specifically the southern Slovenia, the Soča river basin near Trieste, Italy, southwestern Croatia, and Herzegovina.

This animal is most notable for its adaptations to a life of complete darkness in its underground habitat. The olm’s eyes are undeveloped, leaving it blind, while its other senses, particularly those of smell and hearing, are acutely developed. It also lacks any pigmentation in its skin. It has three toes on its forelimbs, but two toes on its hind feet. It also exhibits neoteny, retaining larval characteristics like external gills into adulthood.

The olm’s body is snakelike, 20–30 cm (8–12 in) long, with some specimens reaching up to 40 centimetres (16 in). The olm is extremely vulnerable to changes in its environment due to its adaptation to the specific conditions in caves.

On the IUCN Red List, the olm is listed as vulnerable because of its fragmented and limited distribution and ever-decreasing population.

photo credits: Boštjan Burger, mesozoico, slovenia, animalworld

Reblogged from mechanicanimal  8,320 notes

spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com

Reblogged from strangebiology  87 notes

Book Recommendations

strangebiology:

There is a certain character among you, so I put together a reading list so that you can all be even more weird and creepy. I have put together a list of books that not only are related to the content at StrangeBiology, but have in fact informed a lot of the knowledge behind it. If you enjoy anomalous, extreme, weird, and biological, then these are the books for you. 
(And here are some stores you’d like too.) Click on the titles for links to Amazon.

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1. Mutants: On Genetic Variety and the Human Body

No book has better cemented my qualifications as resident “weird things expert” than this one. 

I’d say this is the best and most interesting trade paperback about teratology out there. It’s easy to read, yet eloquent and packed with science, stories, history, illustration, and event fitting descriptions of mythology. Each chapter explains what a different type of mutation is, how it forms, and how it has been interpreted throughout history. If you found genetics a little boring in bio, let Armand Leroi show you how fascinating they can be.

The only problem with this book is that a number of people thought I was reading about X-Men. 

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2. Freaks: We Who are Not As Others

Also a great read by a man who actually lived the carny life. (With it and for it!) These are stories of people who have serious pathologies, from their own experiences and with their own words, such as the Elephant Man, and amazing stories about how their physiological difference affected their lives. This takes a less scientific approach, more human approach than Mutants. This book is particularly wonderful because you get a glimpse into history that isn’t available anywhere else. The only problem is that means that some of the stories I found I couldn’t confirm.

(Honorable Mention: The Shocked and Amazed! periodical is also a great way to learn about sideshow, freakshow and big top history, lingo, and practices.)

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3. Racing the Antelope: What Animals can Teach Us About Running and Life

This is my absolute favorite book. Yes, I found it because I had typed the word “antelope” into Amazon. But it turned out to be one the best book about biology I had ever read, and the only good book about running I’d ever read.

This was later republished as Why We Run. If you are interested in biology and also a runner, this is a must-read. If you are one or the other, it is still highly recommended. In this book, Bernd Heinrich discusses the issues that runners face, such as keeping cool, pacing, endurance, speed, and hydration. He analyzes animals and how they deal with these issues. This is a story of origins of humanity, running, nature, and our connection to all other life.

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4. The Best of the Best American Science Writing

I recommend the whole series of The Best American Science Writing and The Best American Science and Nature Writing. 

The Best American Series is a series of series’ of collections of the best American writing published each year, organized by topic and aggregated by someone who reads a whole lot about that topic. These books are very useful because it saves you the time of looking for good writing and finding that your articles were simply click-bait or lacking. Every article contained therein is guaranteed to be one of the best articles published in that entire year, according to the editor(s).

They did one better in 2010 and published The Best of the Best American Science Writing, which includes the very best articles from the previous ten years of books published in the series. You will probably never read a better collection of general-population-targeted science articles.

(They also have other titles, but the only other title I’ve read include some from the Crime Reporting series, which has sadly been discontinued.)

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5. Bad Science

Ben Goldacre is a doctor whose book will literally change the way you think. This should be required reading for all journalists, doctors, and scientists, and it’s highly recommended for everyone.

Goldacre is a doctor who makes it his business to expose bad medicine. In this book he exposes quackery like homeopathy and Brain Gym. He explains how statistics can mislead people, how trials are misrepresented in literature, how media sources cling to faulty science practices, and why people believe in fake results. This book would make most readers smarter people.

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6. Ripley’s Believe it or Not! Series

Ripley’s is a big part of why I’m interested in the strange. Their books (of which there are many) are usually very colorful and image-heavy. For that reason they are great for kids. There are also a lot of books that an adult may prefer, such as A Curious Man: The Strange and Brilliant Life of Robert Ripley, but I read all different ones.For the last ten years they have released annual books full of the most interesting news. Of course they are not limited to biology, but their books often include chapters such as “Animals” and “Bodies.”

Right now you can get one for free by sending an object in the mail without packaging!

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7. Strange Biology: On Anomalous Animals, Mutants, and Mad Science

Of course, the book with the content most appropriate for followers of this blog would be the upcoming book based on it.

Just like strangebiology, the book features the freaky aspects of the life sciences. If the project is successfully funded, the chapters will include detailed descriptions, not just photos, of whatever anomalies I can fit, perhaps such as unicorn-goats, deformed antlers, and the bubble boy. If you want to see the book, consider contributing. If the funding goal isn’t met, then no book, but you also don’t get charged. So you win either way!

Please check out the Kickstarter - the ebook version is only $14!

Read More

Reblogged from ichthyologist  99 notes
libutron:

Yaeyama Blenny - Ecsenius yaeyamaensis
Also referred to as Coral Blenny, Ecsenius yaeyamaensis (Perciformes - Blenniidae) is a marine, reef-associated fish native to the Indo-West Pacific region.
The Yaeyama Blenny grows to 6.5 cm in length, and has a pale body with a row of dark dots and dashes extending from behind the eye. There is a Y-shaped dark mark on the pectoral fin base.  
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Russell Gilbert | Locality: Onna-son, Okinawa, Japan (2012)

libutron:

Yaeyama Blenny - Ecsenius yaeyamaensis

Also referred to as Coral Blenny, Ecsenius yaeyamaensis (Perciformes - Blenniidae) is a marine, reef-associated fish native to the Indo-West Pacific region.

The Yaeyama Blenny grows to 6.5 cm in length, and has a pale body with a row of dark dots and dashes extending from behind the eye. There is a Y-shaped dark mark on the pectoral fin base.  

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Russell Gilbert | Locality: Onna-son, Okinawa, Japan (2012)

Reblogged from thatblueyedguy  712 notes

libutron:

Green Throated Mango - Anthracothorax viridigula 

Anthracothorax viridigula (Trochilidae) is a high-flying hummer with an amazing plumage coloration. Both females (top photo) and males (bottom photo) have a black central line on the breast and belly.

The male has an entirely green throat, and glossy green upperparts with a copper tinge. The males’s tail has dark central feathers, the outer tail being wine-red tipped with black.

The female has white underparts and more bronze on the upperparts and flanks; the females tail has also dark central feathers, but the outer tail being wine-red tipped with white. 

The Green-throated Mango prefers coastal areas including mangroves, swamp forests, and semi-wooded zones. This species breeds from northeastern Venezuela, Trinidad and the Guianas south to northeasterm Brazil.

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo credit: ©David Hemmings | Locality: unknown (2010) | [Top] - [Bottom]

Reblogged from mindblowingscience  281 notes

mucholderthen:

Nauplius
Photomicrography by Rogelio Moreno G. 
Posted July 30 and August 2

  1. Viewed in normal light
  2. Dorsal view in polarized light
  3. Ventral view in polarized light
  4. Ventral view in polarized light, altered with lambda plate

NOTE:
Nauplius is one of the types of crustacean larvae; specifically, the larvae of copepods such as cyclops (which were originally called Nauplius).
[More here and here]

Reblogged from carnalcommunion  27,132 notes

sixpenceee:

JOINTS IN MOTION

As said by IFL science

Cameron Drake of San Francisco has created a collection of magnificent images showing joints in motion. He was aided by orthopedic physician Dr. Noah Weiss and the finished product is completely amazing. If you’d like to know more about the project, please check out Drake’s blog.

Reblogged from for-science-sake  360 notes

for-science-sake:

Ampullae of lorenzini are black dots with jelly filled canals or electroreceptors that exist in primitive vertebrates. These are responsible for the unique electro-sensory system seen in some animals such as Sharks, Skates and some Bony Fish.

These sensory cells enable them to detect the electric fields generated by other animals and the electric fields of the Earth. This is primarily responsible for prey location (not smell or movement!) they do this through detecting low frequency signals such as breathing and in some cases signals generated through muscle movement (but this is far less common) Having a range of 5nV/cm they can percieve prey 10cm-10m away, however sometimes their signals are are short circuited by sea water interference.

Another feature of this is the adaptive filter enabling them to distinguish self and externally generated fields, filtering out anything to do with its own activity. 

There are up to 1000 of these sensory cells around, swellings appearing in more dense clusters around the mouthes of these basal vertebrates as the location of their prey is with respect to their mouth.